1930s Loch Ness Monster did exist! (Maybe)

Loch Ness Fish

Loch Ness Fish

The Loch Ness monster was believed to exist according to a 1930s declassified document.

In 1938, the chief constable of Inverness-shire raised concerns about protecting Nessie from hunters!

In a letter released by the National Archives of Scotland (NAS), he wrote: “That there is some strange fish [creature] in Loch Ness now seems beyond doubt.”

Interestingly he refers to it as a “strange fish“, and not a creature or monster.

But what is clear is at the time there was a real concern for the safety of the locals, tourists and the monster itself (if it exists!).

Transcript of the letter can be found below.


INVERNESS-SHIRE CONSTABULARY
COUNTY CONSTABULARY HEADQUARTERS THE CASTLE
INVERNESS. 15th August, 1938

The Loch Ness Monster.

I should like to refer you to your letter to me dated 21st Nov., 1933 (Ref. No. 36125/1) with which you enclosed a copy letter dated 13th Nov., 1933 received by you from Sir Murdoch MacDonald, M.P. for Inverness-shire.

In my reply to this correspondence, dated 23rd Nov., 1933, I indicated the only step which the Police could usefully take, was to warn the people resident in the neighbourhood and as many as possible of the visiting public, that the preservation of the Monster was desired.

It has now come to my notice, that a Mr. Peter Kent and Miss Marion Stirling, both of London, are determined to catch the Monster dead or alive.

Mr. Peter Kent visited Fort Augustus on Friday, 12th August, and was seen there by my Officer stationed at Fort Augustus, to whom he stated that he was having a special harpoon gun made and that he was to return with some twenty experienced men on the 22nd of August for the purpose of hunting the Monster down.

That there is some strange fish (creature) in Loch Ness seems now beyond doubt, but that the Police have any power to protect it is very doubtful. I have, however, caused Mr. Peter Kent to be warned of the desirability of having the creature left alone, but whether my warning will have the desired effect or not remains to be seen.

If you have any suggestion to make or can offer any guidance in the matter, I shall be grateful.

I am, Sir,

Your obedient servant,

William Fraser

Chief Constable.

Government protection for ‘Nessie’ – National Archives of Scotland
April 2010
http://www.nas.gov.uk/about/100408.asp

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