Secret Nazi Bunker discovered in South American Jungle

Interesting, the remains of a secret bunker has been found hidden deep in the Argentinian jungle, believed to have been built by Nazis as a bolt hole if they lost the Second World War.

It’s believed hundreds of officials from the Third Reich fled to South America at the end of the war, but with evidence like this bunker, it’s now believed there was some thought and planning involved.

Local legend suggests the now overgrown ruins, located in Teyu Cuare park near the town of San Ignacio in northern Misiones province was once used as a hide-out for Martin Bormann, Adolf Hitler’s right-hand man.

Coins and porcelain made in Nazi Germany during 1940 have been found at the site. The ruins are located in the secluded area, with walls 3 feet think and don’t match the style of houses in the area. The only explanation is that they were designed as a Nazi shelter for those fleeing Europe at the end of the war.

A secret bunker has been discovered deep in the Argentinian jungle that was likely built by the Nazis in case they lost the Second World War, according to reports. It has long been known that hundreds of officials from the Third Reich fled to South America after 1945 – but the series of “mysterious buildings” in the Parque Teyú Cuare nature reserve suggest a level of pre-planning never before realised. While archaeologists cannot say for certain that the buildings were designed to be used in the event of defeat for Nazi Germany, according to the Washington Post there is strong evidence to suggest that was the case.

Source: The Independent

advertisements

Related Posts

About The Author

Add Comment